LISA MEZZACAPPA

www.lisamezzacappa.com

©ScottFriedlander

Carl Ludwig Hübsch: „Lisa, from the point of view as a listener, how do you tell whether an improvisation is good?“

Lisa Mezzacappa: „You’re starting with the tough ones right from the beginning…“

Huebsch: „What do you listen to if you sit in a concert?“

Mezzacappa: “I think as a listener, I can’t separate the feeling of being also a musician and improviser from being a listener. So I think even as a listener, I might be listening for the same things, which is a sense of immersion and a lack of self-consciousness on the part of the performers. I think that translates to me as something successful.“

Huebsch: “Can you explain that a little bit to me?“

Mezzacappa: „Sure. I guess when I can hear improvisers thinking, it has less of an impact on me. If I feel like they are getting lost in the moment and the interactions, that’s most powerful. Then, I’m also kind of transported as a listener, and in that sense, I feel like being a listener is „LISA MEZZACAPPA“ weiterlesen

CHRIS BROWN

(homepage c.brown): www.cbmuse.com


photo @ Lenny Conzalez

Carl Ludwig Hübsch:“Chris, from a point of view as a listener, how do you tell whether an improvisation is good?“

Chris Brown: „I think there’s more than one way probably.  The first thing that comes to my mind is that I’m hearing ideas. I’m hearing something that’s developing, an idea that grows in some way. If that is in the solo situation, it’s like that. In a duet situation or a group situation, I’m usually listening to the interaction between the players, which shows me that they are listening and that together they are creating a conversation, but more like a structure by means of their responses to each other –  that you can feel and hear the growth of ideas in the music. Maybe that’s the most inclusive definition I can respond with.“

Huebsch: „So, is there something that an improviser needs to know that a person who plays written music doesn’t need to know? Is there a different qualification?“

„CHRIS BROWN“ weiterlesen

KAREN STACKPOLE

Carl Ludwig Hübsch: „From the point of view of a listener, how do you tell whether an improvisation is good?“

Karen Stackpole: „I think that the sounds have a flow to them. You can tell that everyone’s connected by the musical conversations that are taking place – you could have a certain type of sound and someone will reply and then you get a conversation that seems to be happening amongst the musicians.“

Huebsch: „So, is improvised music conversation?“

Stackpole: „To me it is. It could be more like André Breton’s Manifesto of Surrealism, where you just have a stream of consciousness happening. It doesn’t have to make sense – it doesn’t have to be like sound of like sound, but something’s happening that’s flowing, and you can tell when people are relating to each other. I think that’s the best of all, when people are listening and responding to that. You can tell when someone’s not listening or running all over everything. I guess that’s a method as well when someone just kind of runs all over everything.“ „KAREN STACKPOLE“ weiterlesen

SCOTT R. LOONEY

http://scottrlooney.com

Carl Ludwig Hübsch: „Scott, when you listen to improvised music, how can you tell it’s good?“

Scott R. Looney: “Probably the best moments are for me when the whole thing becomes a sort of an amalgam and the individual personalities disappear into the totality of the sound. Those are my favorite moments, when it doesn’t sound like it’s like an ego fest by anybody. I think in general for improvised music there’s a very communal kind of approach, and I find that my favorite moments of improvised music are when that approach makes it so that I almost don’t know who is playing what. Like I get very similar kinds of textures or even feelings from everyone and it just seems like a big communal whole and I don’t feel like identifying anyones part as much.“

Hübsch: „Is that the difference to composed music?“

Looney: „I don’t know. I would certainly say that a piece of composed music has this stamp of the composer’s attitude. But it depends of how the composer is leaning as to whether that comes out as a very individualist kind of response or someone that that encourages improvisation or some variance of interpretation of the music.

„SCOTT R. LOONEY“ weiterlesen

QUESTIONS TO BAY AREA IMPROVISORS :

This blog contains a collection of interviews I made during my AIR Residency in the Headlands Center for the Arts, in September / Oktober 2017, with improvising musicians from the Bay Area. I met Tim Perkis, Karen Stackpole, Gino Robair, Tom Djll, Chris Brown, Aurora Josephson  and some other improvising musicians from the Bay and asked them pretty much the same questions.

The main interest about this work is driven by the idea that listening to improvisations does partially focus on other topics than listening to composed music. In composed music the use of the material and decisions can lead to a reflection on the ideas underlining the composers work. In improvisation the analysis of the material does not necessarily lead to any conclusions. Nonetheless many reviews of improvised music focus on nothing but playing techniques, involving awkward word inventions to describe what kind of noise was made. And unfortunately much too often that´s where it all ends.

I believe that improvisation is put together by interaction (of all kinds) rather than by material. So if you want to speak about improvisation you have to look at the interaction.

The interviews will be published one by one.

TIM PERKIS

http://perkis.com/_site/index.html


Carl Ludwig Huebsch: Tim Perkis, from your point of view as a listener, how do you tell whether an improvisation is good?

Tim Perkis:  As a listener? I probably listen as a player, but I think the sense of intelligence and energy. When improvisation is bad usually it feels boring and listless and uninspired, and when it’s happening is it’s sparkling with some kind of energy.

Huebsch: Is there something an improviser has to know that an interpreter doesn’t?

Perkis: Yes, I think an improviser has to have a broader sense of time and of understanding how long things should go on, when changes have to happen.  One must have an expanded picture of now that includes anticipating changes and understanding the form that’s been implied by what’s come before and so on. An Interpreter has all that written out for them and they just have to make it sound good and keep the moment connected, but they don’t have to think about that broader „TIM PERKIS“ weiterlesen

QUESTIONS TO VIENNA IMPROVISORS :

Dieser Blog enthält Interviews, die ich anlässlich meiner AIR-Residency in Krems mit Wiener Improvisatoren geführt habe. 

This blog contains a collection of interviews I made during my AIR Residency in KREMS, in April 2016, with improvising musicians from Vienna. I met Tiziana Bertoncini, Thomas Lehn, Irene Kepl, Franz Hautzinger, Isabelle Duthoit, Burkhard Stangl, Cordula Bösze, Christian Reiner and Nina Polaschegg and asked them more or less the same questions.

The main interest about this work is driven by the idea that listening to improvisations does partially focus on other topics than listening to composed music. In composed music the use of the material and decisions can lead to a reflection on the ideas underlining the composers work. In improvisation the analysis of the material does not necessarily lead to any conclusions. Nonetheless many reviews of improvised music focus on nothing but playing techniques, involving awkward word inventions to describe what kind of noise was made. And unfortunately much too often that´s where it all ends.

I believe that improvisation is put together by interaction (of all kinds) rather than by material. So if you want to speak about improvisation you have to look at the interaction. So I started these interviews more or less around the question „is improvisation communication?“.

The interviews will be published one by one.

Oh, and one more thing: The language. The interview with Tiziana Bertoncini is in English, the one with Isabelle Duthoit in French and I am afraid the rest is in German.

NINA POLASCHEGG

[Aus Respekt für die beteiligten Musikerinnen und Musiker fragen Sie bitte, falls Sie diese Interviews zitieren oder weiter verwenden wollen, unbedingt bei den Befragten und dem Autor (C.L. HÜBSCH) um Erlaubnis. Vielen Dank für die Solidarität und viel Vergnügen beim Lesen dieser gerne kostebereit gestellten Lektüre.]

CLH: „Ich habe jetzt hier als Gesprächspartnerin Nina Polaschegg, Musikjournalistin und Kontrabassistin, die auch improvisiert und sich im Bereich des Journalismus mit der Improvisierten und der Neuen Musik befasst. Kann ich das so sagen?“

NP: „Stimmt, ja, und gelegentlich noch andere Dinge, naja, Jazz und ganz ganz selten, viel zu selten, die alte Musik.“

CLH: „Nina, welche Kriterien sind für dich als Hörerin für eine Improvisation wichtig?“

NP: „Hilfe, ich habe so etwas befürchtet. Ich weiß gar nicht, ob man die Kriterien wasserdicht machen kann. Schon gar nicht spät abends frierend bevor die letzte U-Bahn fährt, in 1 ½ Minuten Interviewdauer insgesamt.“

Ich suche im Gesamten schon immer nach irgendeiner Art der Weiterentwicklung. Wobei ich nicht weiß, was Weiterentwicklung wirklich genau sein kann. Dann gibt es aber auch wieder Phasen wo ich sage „nein, das ist gut gespielt“. Es hat nichts davon was man jetzt „neu“ nennen möchte und es kann trotzdem eine sehr gute Improvisation sein.“ „NINA POLASCHEGG“ weiterlesen

FRANZ HAUTZINGER

Foto: Daniel Cemborek

[Aus Respekt für die befragten Musikerinnen und Musiker fragen Sie bitte, falls Sie diese Interviews zitieren oder weiter verwenden wollen, unbedingt bei den Befragten und dem Autor (C.L. HÜBSCH) um Erlaubnis. Vielen Dank für die Solidarität! Viel Vergnügen beim Lesen dieser gerne bereit gestellten Lektüre.]

CLH: „Wir sprechen mit Franz Hautzinger und seine Qualitätsmerkmale für improvisierte Musik. Gibt es Qualitätsmerkmale für Improvisation und welche sind das bei dir, wenn du improvisierte Musik hörst, im Konzert zum Beispiel?“

FH: „Ja, ja, doch sehr klar. Wenn ich höre, wenn jemand spielt [lacht]. Na ich höre das Wissen, über das diejenige Person verfügt, die gerade spielt und den Umgang mit Form, Material, Struktur und Psychologie und individuelles Lebensdasein. Und das sind meine Levels, je nachdem, wie jemand an was gearbeitet oder was erfahren hat. Das kann man beim Zuhören sehen und wenn das ganz oben ist, ist das normaler Weise auch sehr gut, weil es beinhaltet das Wissen über die Einzelteile des Ganzen, und die Reflektion. Wissen ist auch immer eine Reflektionsgeschichte. Wenn ich es bei jemanden sehen kann – das ist der Weg den man arbeiten muss -, weiß ich auch, wie es geht und wie man es machen kann, und dann, was es für Auswirkungen hat. So denke ich über das. Und dann wäre es eigentlich auch schon zu ende [lacht]. „FRANZ HAUTZINGER“ weiterlesen

BURKHARD STANGL


Foto: Scott Yanow

[Aus Respekt für die befragten Musikerinnen und Musiker fragen Sie bitte, falls Sie diese Interviews zitieren oder weiter verwenden wollen, unbedingt bei den Befragten und dem Autor (C.L. HÜBSCH) um Erlaubnis. Vielen Dank für die Solidarität! Viel Vergnügen beim Lesen dieser gerne bereit gestellten Lektüre.]

CLH: „Ich rede jetzt mit Burkard Stangl aus Wien. Seit wann in Wien?“

BS: „Seit 1978. Ich bin `60 geboren.“

CLH: „Also fast schon Wiener.“

BS: „Schon Wiener. Wo ich herkomme, ist nicht so weit von Wien weg. Eine Art Vorort von Wien. Also, passt schon.

CLH: „Ich frage Dich, was sind Deine Qualitätsmerkmale, wenn Du Dir improvisierte Musik anhörst?“

BS: „Natürlich ist das gar nicht so einfach zu beantworten, weil es zu differenzieren gilt, denke ich, zwischen Ensemble, Großensemble, Kleinensemble, Solospiel. Und die Wirkungsmechanismen und Wirkungsgrade der jeweiligen Konstellationen spielen natürlich eine Rolle, wie ich das beurteile. Also wenn das London Jazz Composers Orchestra spielt oder größere Ensembleformationen, wirkt ein anderer Moment als wenn ich ein Duo John Butcher mit Phil Minton höre oder ein Solo von egal wem. „BURKHARD STANGL“ weiterlesen